David Garrison „Hardly a day goes by without someone saying Hey, Steve!“

David Garrison ist ein US-amerikanischer Schauspieler und in Deutschland für seine Rolle des Steve Rhoades in Eine schrecklich nette Familie bekannt ist.

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David, How did your passion for acting develop?

I got interested in the theatre in high school, and decided to pursue a degree in acting at a conservatory within a university (in my case, Boston University). I promised myself that if necessary, I’d do something else for a living when I grew up. Well, I haven’t grown up yet, and so far, so good. 

Do you remember a particular moment in your life when you decided that you wanted to be an actor?

I don’t know that there was a particular moment, but when I was 10 years old, I was enlisted to play one of the royal children in my older sister’s high school production of “The King and I,” and I think that was probably the beginning of it all. 

In Germany, many actors start their careers at the theatre and proceed to work in television / the movies only later. Is it the same in the US? How did you start your career? What was your first Role on Theatre?

In the United States, many actors work in the theatre before working in television and film. My first job out of university was as a member of a resident theatre company in Washington, D.C., and I worked there in repertory for three years. I believe my first production at that theater (Arena Stage) was a musical based on the Horatio Alger stories, entitled, appropriately enough, “Horatio.” The final show I did there—a Chris Durang play called “A History of the American Film,” transferred to Broadway, and that’s when I began my New York theatre career. (Chris, by the way, just won this past season’s Tony Award for Best Play.)

As an Actor in Theatre you received several awards, why you decide to play on TV? What was the reason for this?

After a decade of working in the New York theatre, I decided it was time to try other things. An agent from Los Angeles happened to see a play I was doing on Broadway, and convinced me to try my luck in television. I was fortunate enough to land a series—“It’s Your Move,” with Jason Bateman (when we was just a child actor)—that same year. The writer/producers of that series were the same gentlemen who later created “Married With Children.” 

You played a many TV characters in your career, which is your favorite?

I’d have to say Steve Rhoades on “Married With Children,” if for no other reason because the show was so much fun to do. 

He is one of my favorite too, did you still asked about the role from fans?

Hardly a day goes by without someone on the street saying, “Hey, Steve!” or “Where’s Marcy?” 

What are your plans for the future? Where will we see you next?

I’m currently working on a developmental workshop for a new musical based on the novel (and movie) “Tuck Everlasting.” We hope to get it to Broadway soon. Meanwhile, I’m going to be playing opposite Marsha Mason and Marilu Henner this summer in a production of “The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife” At the Bucks County Playhouse, and in the fall, I’ll be playing Capulet in a production of “Romeo and Juliet” at the Classic Stage Company in New York.

When you think about Germany, what’s your first thought?

Wonderful trains. I’ve always loved trains, and the Deutsche Bahn is among the best—if not THE best—railroad in the world. (Bet you thought I was going to say “beer” or “wurst,” didn’t you?) 

No 🙂 Do you want to say something special to the German fans?

Yes. They’re great! I’m so pleased about the success of “Married With Children” in Germany. It’s been great fun traveling in your country, and meeting people who are fans. I have especially enjoyed seeing and hearing myself “speak” German on dubbed episodes of the show. 

With who would you not like to sit in a sauna?

Jabba the Hut from “Star Wars.”

© Daniel Pietrzik | nachgebloggt.de